Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Revolution 2.6: Heroes and Villains

A good Revolution 2.6 tonight, but I guessed the ending long before Rachel started digging up that grave site.  After all, Rachel listens to Charlie, whatever Rachel may say to the contrary.  And Rachael prepared the lethal dose that her father administered with pleasure.  So I could see it coming that it was less than a lethal dose, and Rachael would be digging up the unconscious but not dead Monroe shortly after he was buried.

What I didn't see is that the doc, Rachel's father, would be the mole, feeding the faux US patriots what they need to know.  Whether the doc is doing this to protect his family, or there's something wrong with him - as there is with so many other complex characters on this show - is not clear.  But this development will make for good plot developments in the future (including the chance that the doc is actually a double agent).

So the doc is presumably a villain, Monroe is a villain who may be redeemed - at least, somewhat, in Charlie's eyes - and that brings us back East to Tom.   He's been nothing but a hero this season, and he's now faced with the daunting task of bringing his brainwashed son back to his senses.   This brainwashing is an interesting development, because it leaves open the possibility that some of the baddest asses in the faux patriots are not that bad, just brainwashed.  Which means they could be turned back to good.

The ultimate disposition of brains is probably the most decisive factor in this season of Revolution - most importantly, Aaron's.   The ability to be a fire starter - in Stephen King terms - pretty much trumps all, except a launched nuclear weapon, and for all we know the nanites that Aaron commands can stop that too.  The coming attractions promise a hunt for Aaron, which will be worth watching, since he and his formidable powers are now the focal point of the series.

See also Revolution 2.1: "The Last Surviving Friend" ... Revolution 2.2: Reanimation ... Revolution 2.4: Nanites and ... Maybe Aliens?

And see also Revolution: Preview Review  ... Revolution 1.2: Fast Changes ... Revolution 1.14: Nanites and Jack Bauer ... Revolution 1.15: Major Tom and More 24 ... Revolution 1.16: Feeling a Little Like the Hatch in Lost ... Revolution 1.17: Even Better Nanites ... Revolution 1.18: Whodunnit? ... Revolution 1.19: Cheney's Bunker ... Revolution Season 1 Finale: Good Pivot




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download Revolution season 2 on

New Recording of "Looking for Sunsets (in the Early Morning)" by Sundial Symphony

Delighted to announce that HappySad Records has just released a new version of my "Looking for Sunsets (in the Early Morning)" by Sundial Symphony.

Sundial Symphony consists of Don Frankel and Robbie Rist.  Don played piano and organ on the original recording of "Looking for Sunsets (in the Early Morning)" that appeared on my Twice Upon a Rhyme album in 1972.  Don went on to have career in television, stage, and recording.  Robbie Rist was Cousin Oliver in The Brady Bunch, and has gone to appear in nearly a hundred movies and television shows, including Mutant Teenage Ninja Turtles and Sharknado.

More about Don and Robbie below.  You can get the single either on iTunes or Amazon.


DON FRANKEL performed on off-Broadway stages in NYC including the Shakespeare rock musical Rubber Nickels, and the original cast album. Don’s TV credits include recurring roles on Gimme a Break, Dear John, Santa Barbara, and the pilot of The Proteens, along with several commercials. His film credits include Punch and Jody and Champion. His LA stage credits include performing improvisational comedy on the stages of The Groundlings and The Second City (Diving for Chickens). He also performed with the Los Angeles Children’s Theater. He performed with Jennifer Lopez on her Fiat commercial and her "Papi" music videos, and he performed in Broadway "Hair" Producer Michael Butler's production of "Pope Joan The Musical". Don is a multi-instrumentalist and singer. His musical credits include being a Buddah Records recording artist (on "Looking for Sunsets" by Protozoa, written and produced by Paul Levinson), and playing organ and piano on many of 
the tracks on Paul Levinson's TWICE UPON A RHYME (HappySad Records, 1972; reissued on Whiplash, 1972). Don has also recorded and toured with members of The Standells, The Grass Roots, The Brady Bunch, The Land of the Lost and The Office. Don is a songwriter and has had his songs on radio commercials as well as tv (Poltergeist, The Legacy) and movies (A Beatles Documentary). 

ROBBIE RIST has appeared in nearly a hundred television shows and movies, ranging from the Brady Bunch (where Robbie played Cousin Oliver), the Mary Tyler Moore show (where Robbie played Ted Baxter's son) to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (where Robbie was the voice-over for Michaelangelo) and Sharknado (Robbie the bus driver). Meanwhile, Robbie has been playing music since his teens. His group The Andersons! released "Separated at Birth" (2000) and "Family Secrets" on Smile Records (2001). Robbie has also performed as the lead singer, guitarist, bassist and/or drummer for several other Los Angeles rock bands, including Wonderboy, Cockeyed Ghost, Nice Guy Eddie, and Steve Barton and the Oblivion Click. He has also produced tracks for Suzy & Los Quattro, Backline, Ginger Britt and the Mighty, Jeff Caudill, Kingsizemaybe and The Mockers, and the Rubinoos album Automatic ToasteR. 

Don and Robbie performed together on the Jerry Lewis Telethon in Las Vegas, the Variety Telethon and other TV shows in the 1970s (see photos), and at such famous Los Angeles rock clubs as The Troubadour and The Whiskey A Go Go. Don always loved "Looking for Sunsets (in the Early Morning)," and in the Fall of 2013 teamed up again with Robbie - this time as Sundial Symphony - to record a brand new version of Paul Levinson's 1972 song.


Lyrics to "Looking for Sunsets" here;  Sundial Symphony page on Facebook here.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

The Blacklist 1.6: Truth and Enigma

A really good Blacklist 1.6 tonight, in which Elizabeth thinks she clears Tom, walks away from Red because she's sure he framed Tom, and we find out at the end that Tom is indeed up to more than he seems to be, so Red may be right after all.

The series continues with pretty good standalone stories, and a better infrastructure which has the potential to be riveting, and sometimes is.  James Spader's intensity as Red makes what he says to Elizabeth - and to us, the audience, with his facial expressions when he's alone - pretty much believable.   But if that's true, then Elizabeth has a problem on her hands with Tom, after he played the innocent part just perfectly tonight.

In many ways, Tom is as much an enigma as Red.  Indeed, Tom is even more of an enigma, because all that he has presented to us is his story of innocence -  that is, a story that he is just a social studies teacher, and nothing more - which, as we saw at the end of tonight's episode, and knew all along, is just not true.   In contrast, Red has taken great pains to be truthful, at least to Elizabeth.  Or, to be more precise, Red takes great pains not to commit any overt lies, or lies of commission. But it's likely and almost definite that he's leaving lots of things out - lies of omission - if only to protect Elizabeth.

Red's interest in protecting Elizabeth seems genuine.   If we learn somewhere down the line that this is an act, that would be inconsistent with the complex web the series has constructed.   Therefore, if we believe that Red has Elizabeth's best interests at heart, we have to accept that he's right about Tom being a liar.

Meanwhile, we don't know who Tom might be working for, if not for Red or for the Feds we've seen.   But, who, then?  Good guys or bad guys?  Another black ops US agency, the Israel Mossad - or some agency serving an interest that's out to get the United States?

Should be some interesting viewing ahead.

See also The Blacklist Debuts: Alias Meets Jay Z ... The Blacklist 1.2: Mysteries ... The Blacklist 1.3: Construction Site Heights




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Monday, October 28, 2013

The Walking Dead 4.3: Death in Every Corner

There was death in every corner of The Walking Dead 4.3 last night - I can't think of a single major character who didn't have a close encounter with death, whether zombie or flu-plague or whatever. This heightened in-your-face peril is making this the best season of The Walking Dead since its debut  a few years ago.

But Hershel provided one of the real profiles in courage, with his decision to go in and treat the flu-ridden patients even though the risk is real that he'll contract it.  Of course, as I've pointed out in previous reviews, and as Herschel mentions himself, people have different levels of resistance to any flu strain, so it's by no means clear that Hershel will get it.   But he's certainly increased his chances of falling ill by attending to the ill in the prison.

What role the antibiotics will play, if our team indeed gets back with them, is also not clear.  The meds could range from curing everyone to just some of the afflicted to no one.  It's hard to imagine The Walking Dead without Glenn, so presumably he'll be saved, but I felt the same way about Lori.

Hershel's bravery was not a transformation but a confirmation of the brave soul that we already knew he was.    Carol's toughness is, in contrast, much more a change from what we thought her to be.  We saw the beginning this season in her teaching the students how to kill walkers, but in 4.3 her revelation as the killer of the corpses we saw at the end of 4.2 is a surprise.  In retrospect it makes perfect sense, as good narrative surprises do, which is the paradox of the effective surprise.

It was good to see Darryl and Michonne fighting so well together.  They're obviously not out of the woods on this yet, and next week bears some high anxiety watching.

See also The Walking Dead 4.1: The New Plague ... The Walking Dead 4.2: The Baby and the Flu







-> Just in time for the new plague on The Walking Dead, win a free copy ofThe Consciousness Plague on Starpulse!


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Sunday, October 27, 2013

The Good Wife 5.5: The Villain in This Story

The Good Wife came through with its promise of an episode that would change everything - 5.5 surely did, in a story that was minute for minute one of the best hours I've ever seen on television.

You know what happened, so I won't burden you with a recap.  Instead, I'll cut to the chase with this honest observation:  I was rooting for Alicia and Cary at the beginning of the episode, but, by the end, I was rooting for Will and company, or what would wind up still being Lockhart, Gardner.

The two sides were and are pretty evenly matched.  Will's the best lawyer in the bunch.   But Alicia and Cary are better than any of the older parters, with the exception of Diane, who now will likely be staying in the firm.

I enjoyed the match of wits and tactics.   I also enjoyed - as drama - Peter as governor coming to the aid of his wife.  But I couldn't root for such de facto corruption.  Peter's threatening Chum Hum with looking into taxation of Internet business was bad enough.   But his pulling the Supreme Court judgeship from Diane was going too far.

I get that this a realistic portrayal of politics and business, but I don't have to like or admire it.   It's admirable that Peter is coming to the defense of Alicia as her husband.   But using the weight of his office to do this sticks in the craw.   Politics doesn't always have to be like this.

It does have the good effect of likely keeping Diane with Gardner, Lockhart.   And with Kalinda still working for Will, this firm will be able to put up a good fight against Florrick, Agos, Associates,  and the Governor on their side.  There should be some superb television ahead in Chicago this season!

See also The Good Wife 5.1: Capital Punishment and Politicians' Daughters





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Boardwalk Empire 4.8: Knives in the Back

I think my favorite scene in Boardwalk Empire 4.8 is when tears well up in Chalky's eyes as Maitland sings to him.   Those tears would be the turning point in their relationship so far, a turning point that would save Chalky's life.

It was those tears that no doubt got Maitland to realize that she cared too much about Chalky to let him be killed by Narcisse's man Purnsley.   First she tries to get Chalky to leave.  Then, in the pivotal instant, she stabs Purnsley in the back, which saves Chalky's life.

That stab in the back was a work of art.  Purnsley has in effect stabbed Chalky in the back with his treachery, and Maitland was on the path of doing the same to her lover.   So it's completely appropriate that Maitland turns on Paisley with a knife in his back.

It's also satisfying to see a human reaction to tears - Maitland's reaction to Chalky's - having such profound consequences.   What's not clear is what Chalky's reaction will be, after he gets over the trauma of what just happened and almost happened to him.  He knows that Maitland set him up - that's why we see him ask Purnsley how he knew that Chalky was at Maitland's place - and how he will mix that in with Maitland deciding at the last minute to go with Chalky will be interesting to see.

The other treachery afoot in this powerful episode is, once again, Eli's to Nucky.  This time, Eli's actions are at least motivated not by greed and pride but by wanting to protect his family - specifically, Willie.   Still, it's hard to imagine just how far Eli will go with this.   He's not about to commit suicide, as Eddie did, so what will he do as the Feds pull the noose tighter around him?

The human drama simmers in Boardwalk Empire.

See also Boardwalk Empire 4.1: Sneak Preview Review ... Boardwalk Empire 4.2: Sneak Preview Review ... Boardwalk Empire 4.2: J. Edgar ...Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview Review 4.3: Honey, Sunny ...Boardwalk Empire 4.3: Nucky, Sunshine, and Heroin ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview Review 4.4: Downfalls ... Boardwalk Empire 4.4: Bullies and Betrayals ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.5: The Gift of Rage ... Boardwalk 4.5: Two Deaths ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.6: Good Lovin' ... Boardwalk Empire 4.6: Sally and Margaret ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.7: Beds, Promotions, Surprises ... Boardwalk Empire 4.7: Family and History ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.8: The Blues

And see also Boardwalk Empire 3.1: Happy News Year 1923  ... Boardwalk Empire 3.2: Gasoline and the White Rock Girl ... Boardwalk Empire 3.3: The Showgirl and The Psycho ... Boardwalk Empire 3.5: "10 L'Chaim" ... Boardwalk Empire 3.7: Deadly Gillian ... Boardwalk Empire 3.8: Andrew Mellon ... Boardwalk Empire 3.9: Impaired Nucky


And see also Boardwalk Empire 2.1: Politics in an Age Before YouTube  ... Boardwalk Empire 2.2: The Woman Behind the Throne ... Boardwalk Empire 2.3: Frankenstein and Victrola ... Boardwalk Empire 2.4: Nearly Flagrante Delicto ... Boardwalk Empire 2.5: Richard's Story ... Boardwalk Empire 2.6: Owen and Other Bad News for Nucky ... Boardwalk Empire 2.7: Shot in the Hand  ...Boardwalk Empire 2.8: Pups with Fangs ... Boardwalk Empire 2.9: Ireland, Radio, Polio ...Boardwalk Empire 2.10: Double Shot ... Boardwalk Empire 2.11: Gillian and Jimmy  ... Boardwalk Empire Season 2 Finale: Stunner!





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Friday, October 25, 2013

Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.8: The Blues

Continuing with my sneak preview reviews of Boardwalk Empire - this one of 4.8 - courtesy of screeners from Starpulse, guaranteed to be specific spoiler free, and to be followed this Sunday with a proper recap/review right after the episode has aired in New York City, just up the road from A.C.

Music played a bigger than usual role in episode 4.8, especially with Maitland doing some fine singing, which Chalky tells Nucky is "the blues".   But the show ends with a 1920s version of Lonnie Donegan's "Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight," sung in Eli's home, on into the closing credits, and providing a great chilling contrast to what we've just seen, and the possibly even worse of what's to later come.

Killings:  There are two in the episode, one of a minor character, which leads to a series of events and the killing of a much more major character.  The murder weapon - in the second killing - is a knife in the back, not a gun.  But the act is not an act of perfidy, at least not to the victim.   And among the many powerful things about this scene is that it looks, for a moment or two, as if an even more major character might die.

And that's not the powerful or important theme or development in this episode.   That distinction would belong to the FBI's making a major move on Nucky, which, if followed through, could prove his undoing.  But I'm betting/hoping it doesn't come to that - though, honestly, that's more a hope than a bet, given what we've seen on BE in the past.

It was good to see Sally again, this time up East, to Nucky's surprise and mostly delight.  The part that's not delight ends in the only other act of violence in the episode, but it's not a death and it's well deserved.

And I'll be back here this Sunday night with a more detailed review of this episode after it airs on HBO.

In the meantime, here's Lonnie Donegan singing that chewing gum song ...





See also Boardwalk Empire 4.1: Sneak Preview Review ... Boardwalk Empire 4.2: Sneak Preview Review ... Boardwalk Empire 4.2: J. Edgar ...Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview Review 4.3: Honey, Sunny ...Boardwalk Empire 4.3: Nucky, Sunshine, and Heroin ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview Review 4.4: Downfalls ... Boardwalk Empire 4.4: Bullies and Betrayals ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.5: The Gift of Rage ... Boardwalk 4.5: Two Deaths ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.6: Good Lovin' ... Boardwalk Empire 4.6: Sally and Margaret ... Boardwalk Empire Sneak Preview 4.7: Beds, Promotions, Surprises ... Boardwalk Empire 4.7: Family and History

And see also Boardwalk Empire 3.1: Happy News Year 1923  ... Boardwalk Empire 3.2: Gasoline and the White Rock Girl ... Boardwalk Empire 3.3: The Showgirl and The Psycho ... Boardwalk Empire 3.5: "10 L'Chaim" ... Boardwalk Empire 3.7: Deadly Gillian ... Boardwalk Empire 3.8: Andrew Mellon ... Boardwalk Empire 3.9: Impaired Nucky


And see also Boardwalk Empire 2.1: Politics in an Age Before YouTube  ... Boardwalk Empire 2.2: The Woman Behind the Throne ... Boardwalk Empire 2.3: Frankenstein and Victrola ... Boardwalk Empire 2.4: Nearly Flagrante Delicto ... Boardwalk Empire 2.5: Richard's Story ... Boardwalk Empire 2.6: Owen and Other Bad News for Nucky ... Boardwalk Empire 2.7: Shot in the Hand  ...Boardwalk Empire 2.8: Pups with Fangs ... Boardwalk Empire 2.9: Ireland, Radio, Polio ...Boardwalk Empire 2.10: Double Shot ... Boardwalk Empire 2.11: Gillian and Jimmy  ... Boardwalk Empire Season 2 Finale: Stunner!






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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

The Fifth Estate: First Rate and Important

I just got back from a private screening of The Fifth Estate - the new movie about Julian Assange and WikiLeaks.   The screening, though, was in a public theater - the Greenburgh Multiplex.  And it was private because I was the only person in the theater, truly.  (Ordinarily my wife would have been with me, but she's recovering from a cold.   She was concerned her cough might disturb people in the theater - little did she know.)

Now I assume part of this poor attendance can be attributed to a typical weekday night.  But some of it is no doubt due to the public's lack of interest in this movie, and/or the negative reviews it's received, and that's a shame.

A lot of the movie is told from the perspective of Daniel Berg, the German info-activist who helped get WikiLeaks going, but who split with Assange when the Manning leaks first hit.   Assange has denounced the movie on the grounds that it is based in large part on Berg's book, which Assange of course thinks is biased.  You know what?  I don't care.  Since I wasn't there, I can't possibly know whether Berg's negative assessments of Assange are true.   But it doesn't matter, because even if Berg is right, that does not counter-act or erase the enormous and revolutionary good Assange has done.

Among the aspects of WikiLeaks which are verifiable is that no one lost his or her life as a result of the Manning leaks.   The movie, however, included a high-tension scene of someone outed by leaks escaping from Lybia to Egypt, with the lives of him and his family in immediate peril.   Did this really happen? Perhaps.  But the only things we know for sure happened as a result of the huge number of cable documents Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning gave to WikiLeaks is that people in the US State Department and elsewhere were embarrassed.  And maybe that's good.

What's certainly good in the movie is this:   In one of the best scenes in the movie, the UK Guardian editor (one of the three papers that published the initial leaks) talked about how the fourth estate - journalism prior to the digital age - started when courageous pamphleteers published Parliamentary discussions which were supposed to be secret.  In those days, all such governmental deliberations were kept from the public.  But how can a democracy work if such deliberations are kept from the people who vote?  In provoking questions such as these, The Fifth Estate continues in the tradition of important movies about the media, ranging from Medium Cool to The Social Contract, and television shows like The Hour and The Newsroom.

Our freedoms are indeed predicated on access to information and knowledge.  Kings and parliaments even in more democratic societies strove to keep that information from view, but lost those battles in the long run.   In today's age, a WikiLeaks or its equivalent is needed to keep our world fully informed. Whether Assange is a nice guy or not is beside the point.  What counts is that he and WikiLeaks are fighting that same battle today, on the global level of digital media.   And we the freedom-loving public are its beneficiaries.

For more of my views about WikiLeaks, see this live chat several weeks ago on Canada.com ...

Also catch my interview about The Fifth Estate on Bob Mann's Let's Consider the Source this weekend (October 26-28, 2013) on Sirius/XM Radio.


Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Bones 9.6: The Wedding

Well, the producers pulled out all the stops for Bones and Booth's wedding in episode 9.6 tonight - the whole family (except Booth's brother Jared and Bones' brother Russ), all the interns (except, of course, Zack Addy), and all the great musical talent (except Angela's father Billy Gibbons of  ZZ Top).

Ok - I guess there was no reason that Gibbons would have been at the wedding, and Zack Addy's in some psych ward in a prison - but they could have had a hologram or something of him.   My point is why come close to completeness and leave it just a few people short?  Jared and Russ definitely should have been in the final, beautiful scene (maybe they were, and I missed them) (but assuming they weren't - Fox or producers or whoever should have come up with a little more money to pay these actors) (Christine wasn't there, either, but I read somewhere that the little twin actresses were having a bad day, so the producers get a pass on that).

And the scene was beautiful, from the interns' dress-up to Cyndi Lauper's great singing to the exchange of vows between Booth and Brennan.  The wedding was so satisfying that it could have been the final scene of the series, and the producers deserve a lot of credit not only for bringing us this scene, but making it a foundation for exciting adventures to come.

And indeed, there might have been a hint of what Bones and Booth and the team will face, now that Pelant is presumably gone.  Who burned down the church that Bones and Booth were to be married in?Was it just an accident, possibly the result of the lit candles that we saw so prominently?   Or was it the work of someone who hates Bones and Booth, and was quietly showing this hatred tonight?

Well, that's a story - if it is a story - for another time.   Tonight, it was great to see Parker and how he's beginning to grow up, and Daisy sitting near Sweets (I still think they were good together), and most of all Bones and Booth together at long last as they were meant to be.  Here's a toast to their marriage and great series!

See also Bones 9.1: The Sweet Misery of Love ... Bones 9.2: Bobcat, Identity Theft, and Sweets ... Bones 9.3 and NCIS 11.2: Sweets and Ziva ... Bones 9.4: Metaphysics of Death in a Television Series ... Bones 9.6: Val and Deep Blue

And see also Bones 8.1: Walk Like an Egyptian ... Bones 8.2 of Contention ... Bones 8.3: Not Rotting Behind a Desk  ... Bones 8.4: Slashing Tiger and Donald Trump ... Bones 8.5: Applesauce on Election Eve ... Bones 8.6: Election Day ... Bones 8.7: Dollops in the Sky with Diamonds ...Bones 8.8: The Talking Remains ... Bones 8.9: I Am A Camera ... Bones 8.10-11: Double Bones ...Bones 8.12: Face of Enigmatic Evil ... Bones 8.13: Two for the Price of One ... Bones 8.14: Real Life ... Bones 8.15: The Magic Bullet and the Be-Spontaneous Paradox ... Bones 8.16: Bitter-Sweet Sweets and Honest Finn ... Bones 8.17: "Not Time Share, Time Travel" ... Bones 8.18: Couples ... Bones 8.19: The Head in the Toilet ... Bones 8.20: On Camera ... Bones 8.21: Christine, Hot Sauce, and the Judge ... Bones 8.22: Musical-Chair Parents ... Bones 8.23: The Bluff ... Bones Season 8 Finale: Can't Buy the Last Few Minutes

And see also Bones 7.1: Almost Home Sweet Home ... Bones 7.2: The New Kid and the Fluke ...Bones 7.3: Lance Bond and Prince Charmington ... Bones 7.4: The Tush on the Xerox ... Bones 7.5: Sexy Vehicle ... Bones 7.6: The Reassembler ... Bones 7.7: Baby! ... Bones 7.8: Parents ...Bones 7.9: Tabitha's Salon ... Bones 7.10: Mobile ... Bones 7.11: Truffles and Max ... Bones 7.12: The Corpse is Hanson ... Bones Season 7 Finale: Suspect Bones

And see also Bones 6.1: The Linchpin ... Bones 6.2: Hannah and her Prospects ... Bones 6.3 at the Jersey Shore, Yo, and Plymouth Rock ... Bones 6.4 Sans Hannah ... Bones 6.5: Shot and Pretty ... Bones 6.6: Accidental Relations ... Bones 6.7:  Newman and "Death by Chocolate" ...Bones 6.8: Melted Bones ... Bones 6.9: Adelbert Ames, Jr. ... Bones 6.10: Reflections ... Bones 6.11: The End and the Beginning of a Mystery ... Bones 6.12 Meets Big Love ... Bones 6.13: The Marrying Kind ... Bones 6.14: Bones' Acting Ability ... Bones 6.15: "Lunch for the Palin Family" ...Bones 6.16: Stuck in an Elevator, Stuck in Times ... Bones 6.17: The 8th Pair of Feet ... Bones 6.18: The Wile E. Chupacabra ... Bones 6.19 Test Runs The Finder ... Bones 6.20: This Very Statement is a Lie ... Bones 6.21: Sensitive Bones ... Bones 6.22: Phoenix Love ... Bones Season 6 Finale: Beautiful

And see also Bones: Hilarity and Crime and Bones is Back For Season 5: What Is Love? and 5.2: Anonymous Donors and Pipes and 5.3: Bones in Amish Country and 5.4: Bones Meets Peyton Place and Desperate Housewives and Ancient Bones 5.5 and Bones 5.6: A Chicken in Every Viewer's Pot and Psychological Bones 5.7 and Bones 5.8: Booth's "Pops" and Bones 5.9 Meets Avatar and Videogamers ... Bad Santa, Heart-Warming Bones 5.10 ... Bones 5.11: Of UFOs, Bloggers, and Triangles ... Bones 5.12: A Famous Skeleton and Angela's Baby ... Love with Teeth on Bones 5.13 ... Faith vs. Science vs. Psychology in Bones 5.14 ... Page 187 in Bones 5.15 ...Bones 100: Two Deep Kisses and One Wild Relationship ... Bones 5.17: The Deadly Stars ...Bones Under Water in 5.18 ... Bones 5.19: Ergo Together ...  Bones 5.20: Ergo Together ... Bones 5.21: The Rarity of Happy Endings ... Bones Season 5 Finale: Eye and Evolution




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