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Marilyn and Monet by Paul Levinson

Marilyn and Monet

by Paul Levinson

Giveaway ends November 28, 2017.

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Monday, November 20, 2017

Why the Government Should Always Keep Its Hands Off Media

The news that the Trump administration is suing to block the merger of AT& T and Time Warner - presumably stemming from Trump's pique over CNN's truthful reporting of news about Trump, which he deems to be "fake news" (CNN has long been part of Time Warner) - is unsurprising, and sadly demonstrates a point I've been making for decades: the government should keep its hands entirely off media, including not bringing to bear anti-trust laws.

I was never much in favor of anti-trust laws, anyway - the marketplace is a better regulator of business than the government - but when applied to businesses that have nothing or not much to do with communication, they are not unconstitutional.   In the case of media, any attempt to regulate - whether its content, its corporate structure, any aspect of media - is a blatant violation of the First Amendment, and its provision that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press."

And even when well-intended, such anti-trust laws are unnecessary when applied to media.  As I argued in my 1998 article in The Industry Standard - "Leave Poor Microsoft Alone" (not my title) - all the handwringing over Microsoft dominating the personal computing industry back then was not needed, and ignorant of media evolution.   As I point out in my Human Replay: A Theory of the Evolution of Media, history has shown that we humans bend media to what we want as consumers, not what corporations may try to dictate.  And sure enough, as the hue-and-cry against Microsoft in the late 1990s was reaching a crescendo, Apple was already on the way to staging a comeback with their rehire of Steve Jobs - a comeback which reversed the dominance of Microsoft, and left Apple in the powerful position it still has today.

The bottom line of all this is the Founding Fathers were right in what they put in the First Amendment.  For democracy to function well, government should have zero control of media - zero, whether Trump, Clinton, Obama, anyone in between.  (Which, by the way, is why I'm also no fan of so-called net neutrality.)



The Girlfriend Experience 2.5-6: In and Out

The hottest episode of The Girlfriend Experience so far this new season - episode 2.5-6 - in the Erica and Anna action.  But the Bria segment made up for it with a more compelling narrative.

Indeed, the political backdrop of Erica and Anna is, at this point, too much in the background, or too literally backdrop.  Many of the scenes are even shot this way, long shots of people sitting a tables, which could almost be still-shots to accompany the conversation.   Fortunately, Erica and Anna are both captivating characters, especially Erica, who carries the story with her irrepressible seductions, especially what she does to Anna at a counter in a crowded venue.

Bria's attempts to seduce men are, alas, not irrepressible at all.   She struck out last week with Ian, and still can't much more than a kiss from Paul, and not even that when the "children" aka Kayla are around.   None of this is Bria's fault.  Ian's calling on all his strength to be professional, and he'll likely to surrender to Bria before the end of this season.   As for Paul ...

Well, obviously, there's something wrong with him.  His playing the perfect gentleman is just that - an act.  It's not that he doesn't want to sleep with Bria, it's that he's pursuing the relationship for some other reason.  Either his idea of the girlfriend experience is literally a friendship and nothing more - not very likely - or he has some other motive in all of this.  Maybe he's connected to the case in some way, working for the people Bria will be testifying against?  But if that, how did he find out about Bria?

That's what I meant about the Bria story being more compelling at this point.  And I'll be back next week with more.


See also  The Girlfriend Experience 2.1-2: Two for One ...  The Girlfriend Experience 2.3-4: Hard to Come By

And see also The Girlfriend Experience: Eminently Worth It (my review of Season 1)

 

It all started in the hot summer of 1960, when Marilyn Monroe walked off the set of The Misfits and began to hear a haunting song in her head, "Goodbye Norma Jean" ...

The Walking Dead 8.5: True Confessions




Here, in order of importance, are some of the many game-changing or game-revealing moments in tonight's episode 8.5 of The Walking Dead.  Nah, they're all so important, I can't logically rank them.  So I'll give them the good old bullet treatment:

  • That flying machine that Rick saw overhead - that could definitely change everything.  Any sign of advanced civilization - i.e., our world, as it is now, or before the plague, in The Walking Dead, is a big deal.
  • Eugene figured out that Dwight is the turncoat,  Given Negan's little talk with Eugene at the end, the pressure is really turned up.  It will be tempting indeed for Eugene to turn Dwight in - unless his superior intellect tells him that Negan (the one Negan) will lose in the end.  My best bet is ... well, too close to call, but at this point I'd give Eugene protecting Dwight the slight edge (I haven't read the comics).
  • Negan's confession to Gabriel: Negan admits weakness because he couldn't bring himself to end his first wife, who was sick and presumably dying, after the plague had started.   Not the most earthshaking confession. But, from Negan, anything of this sort is fairly astounding.
  • Speaking of Gabriel: what is his ailment that we see so vividly at the end?  The strong implication is that he was bitten, but .... well, that hasn't happened to one of major characters in a long time, which makes it even more likely now.
  • Back to Rick: he and Daryl actually come to blows, and - unsurprisingly - neither gets a clear win, though Daryl comes out slightly ahead.  It was a good scene.
Seeing the other side - or, in this case, the inside of events that opened the season - is always a strong narrative move.  Tonight's episode showed us lots of inside, other side stories, and was one of the best of this already-excellent season so far.

See also: The Walking Dead 8.4: The King's Not Smiling

And see also:  The Walking Dead 7.1 ... The Walking Dead 7.7: Negan and the Kids

And see also: The Walking Dead 6.1: The Walking Herd ...  The Walking Dead Season 6 Finale: Who Was It?

And see also: The Walking Dead 5.1: The Redemption of Carole ... The Walking Dead 5.3: Meets Alfred Hitchcock and The Twilight Zone ... The Walking Dead 5.4: Hospital of Horror ... The Walking Dead 5.5: Anatomy of a Shattered Dream ... The Walking Dead 5.6-7: Slow ... The Walking Dead 5.8: Killing the Non-Killer ... The Walking Dead 5.9: Another Death in the Family ... The Walking Dead 5.11: The Smiling Stranger ... The Walking Dead 5.12: The Other Shoe ... The Walking Dead 5.13: The Horse and the Party ... The Walking Dead 5.15: The Bad Guy ... The Walking Dead Season 5 Finale: Morgan and Optimism

And see also The Walking Dead 4.1: The New Plague ... The Walking Dead 4.2: The Baby and the Flu ... The Walking Dead 4.3: Death in Every Corner ...The Walking Dead 4.4: Hershel, Carl, and Maggie ... The Walking Dead 4.6: The Good Governor ... The Walking Dead 4.7: The Governor's Other Foot ... The Walking Dead 4.8: Vintage Fall Finale ... The Walking Dead 4.9: A Nightmare on Walking Dead Street ... The Walking Dead 4:14: Too Far ... The Walking Dead Season 4 Finale: From the Gunfire into the Frying Pan





Sunday, November 19, 2017

Outlander 3.10: Typhoid Story

Another fine episode of Outlander tonight - 3.10 - in which Claire uses her future knowledge of Typhoid Mary - not the comic-book character - the real woman, Mary Mallon who has the dubious distinction of being the first publicly identified asymptomatic carrier, in her case, typhoid fever.  This happened in the early part of the 20th century, when the discovery that Mallon was infected by typhoid fever, but had no symptoms, but spread the illness, was a major milestone in fighting infectious disease.  So, actually, I guess the distinction is not dubious but good for the public health.

In Outlander, Claire's ID of the typhoid asymptomatic carrier on the English ship earns her the appreciation of the young captain.  But as in many things Outlander, that appreciation is not enough to sway the captain from his pursuit of Jamie - having been tipped off, unfortunately, by that guy in Edinburgh who got his face burned.  That's the way it is in Outlander.  Not only does no good deed go unpunished, it sometimes makes things worse for the do-gooder, in this case, Claire.

Fortunately, there's someone else on board who appreciates Claire's medical savvy and the people she saved.  The German woman and her grass-needing goats does a great job of pushing Claire overboard - which under the circumstances is the best thing for Claire.  It's the only way she can warn and save him, given the young captain's devotion not to what's right but to duty.

Back on the ship with Jamie, I can't say that I admire Fergus's restraint with Marsali, Jamie's step daughter.  I mean, I could say that I admire his restraint, but I'd be a hypocrite.  Because, given how much he loves and wants Marsali, and she him, and add to that perilous environment that they're in, where they might not survive another day, why wait? I doubt that Jamie would have said no to Claire's entreaties in similar circumstances (in fact, if memory serves, he didn't).

But I guess this makes Fergus a more interesting character, and it will be good to see how this all works out (or some of it, because it never all works out in Outlander, part of what makes it fun) in the episodes and seasons ahead.

See also Outlander Season 3 Debut: A Tale of Two Times and Places ...Outlander 3.2: Whole Lot of Loving, But ... Outlander 3.3: Free and Sad ... Outlander 3.4: Love Me Tender and Dylan ... Outlander 3.5: The 1960s and the Past ... Outlander 3.6: Reunion ... Outlander 3.7: The Other Wife ... Outlander 3.8: Pirates! ... Outlander 3.9: The Seas

And see also Outlander 2.1: Split Hour ... Outlander 2.2: The King and the Forest ... Outlander 2.3: Mother and Dr. Dog ... Outlander 2.5: The Unappreciated Paradox ... Outlander 2.6: The Duel and the Offspring ...Outlander 2.7: Further into the Future ... Outlander 2.8: The Conversation ... Outlander 2.9: Flashbacks of the Future ... Outlander 2.10: One True Prediction and Counting ... Outlander 2.11: London Not Falling ... Outlander 2.12: Stubborn Fate and Scotland On and Off Screen ... Outlander Season 2 Finale: Decades

And see also Outlander 1.1-3: The Hope of Time Travel ... Outlander 1.6:  Outstanding ... Outlander 1.7: Tender Intertemporal Polygamy ...Outlander 1.8: The Other Side ... Outlander 1.9: Spanking Good ... Outlander 1.10: A Glimmer of Paradox ... Outlander 1.11: Vaccination and Time Travel ... Outlander 1.12: Black Jack's Progeny ...Outlander 1.13: Mother's Day ... Outlander 1.14: All That Jazz ... Outlander Season 1 Finale: Let's Change History

 

It all started in the hot summer of 1960, when Marilyn Monroe walked off the set of The Misfits and began to hear a haunting song in her head, "Goodbye Norma Jean" ...


Friday, November 17, 2017

The Orville 1.10: Bring in the Clowns

Clowns, as everyone knows, have become icons not only of slapstick comedy but cold-sweat fright.  What better a dual symbol, then, for The Orville, and its deft mix of laughs and hazardous adventure in space, then a clown that attacks Alara, then disappears, only to be the beginning of a whole series of terrifying encounters for Alara and the crew.

I must say that I'm really enjoying watching and reviewing The Orville.  It's as if the original Star Trek, which I saw in barely color in the 1960s, were shown on a format that I could stop and rewind, and blog about any time right after.  Yeah, that's definitely part of the joy of The Orville - it allows us to watch Star Trek: TOS as it might have been seen on the screen in 2017.

Alara and what turn out to be her simulated illusions are the heart of The Orville 1.10.  That's actually a nice twist and update of the original Star Trek motif, in which the illusion might have been due to some alien fungus that somehow got on to the ship - or might not have been illusions at all.  Illusions are of course the stuff of the holodeck introduced in Star Trek: The Next Generation, and the role in this episode of The Orville shows its continuing cracked fidelity to both TOS and TNG.

But significantly, I thought the single best line came from a non-illusory long-distance conversation Alara has with her snobbish parents, in which her father opines that we humans are "the hillbillies of the galaxy".  That's a line that Spock might well have thought, but never have spoken.

I have to tell you that, for whatever reason, I'm somewhat immune to scary clowns - they don't much frighten me, maybe because we have so many scary clowns who are not dressed like clowns in our 2017 reality.   Anyway, I'm looking forward to the next episode, and I gave The Orville and its Rolling Stones tongue a shout-out not far into a two hour interview Jim Freund did with me last night on his Hour of the Wolf on WBAI Radio.  Here's the video, scroll down, it's no illusion.

See also The Orville 1.1-1.5: Star Trek's Back ... The Orville 1.6-9: Masterful


1st starship to Alpha Centauri ... had only enough fuel to get there

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

The Girlfriend Experience 2.3-4: Hard to Come By

The Girlfriend Experience continued its second season of split hour stories in 2.3-4 with two stories having almost nothing in common other than the girlfriend experience and sexual fulfillment being hard to come by.

Bria leads off with a guy who doesn't want to rush things, and resists her sweet offer of sex at least twice.   At this point, it's not clear if this is actually not a true girlfriend experience, in which the experience leads to, or frames, the sex, or just a longer lead time than usual (I suspect the latter).  And then, when she seeks some comfort in her witness protection protector, he says no, too, after they get all to the verge.  That, I guess, makes sense, since he takes his job seriously.  But Bria can't be happy that her powers seduction have failed with two men, in so short a time.

Meanwhile, Anna (I think) let's Erica make her come (I say I think, because I'm assuming faking it is a big part of her job), but Erica says she can't reciprocate.  Actually Erica's inability comes first, which makes it even more likely that Anna's faking it to keep Erica engaged.  But, who knows, we don't Anna well enough, as yet, to tell.

Given that each hour consists of two separate stories, it's reasonable to ask or wonder or whatever the right verb is about which of the stories is better.  It's pretty even, so far.  Bria's story is one hell of a witness protection tale so far, and all the characters, especially Kayla, have not yet come into play.  And you couldn't ask for a more relevant story that Anna and Erica's, given what we're seeing on the news every day.

More to follow.

See also  The Girlfriend Experience 2.1-2: Two for One ...  The Girlfriend Experience: Eminently Worth It (my review of Season 1)

 

It all started in the hot summer of 1960, when Marilyn Monroe walked off the set of The Misfits and began to hear a haunting song in her head, "Goodbye Norma Jean" ...

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The Orville 1.6-9: Masterful




Completing my catch-up with The Orville, the immensely enjoyable take-off on Star Trek, I watched episodes 1.6-9 last night.  They each were superb.

  • 1.6 is a classic undercover story, that was done so well on Star Trek: TOS.   The worst enemy (so far) in The Orville universe are the Krill, who don't look like Klingons but resemble them in penchant for aggression.  Interestingly, Bortus and the Moclans look more like the Klingons, and have some of their ferocity, but are more like the Worf-kind of Klingon on the bridge of Star Trek: TNG.  But neither are the Krill like the Romulans, who in effect are evil Vulcans not evil Klingons.  In any case, 1.6 was a great hour, and even had some tenderness with the Krill teacher, who also provided a great parting punch with her remark that the children Mercer saved will grow up to hate humans.
  • 1.7 with its Like and Dislike buttons and their life-and-death impact is a little masterpiece in itself, and could have been a episode of Black Mirror, or even a satirical movie about life on Earth in 2017.  The Orville is doing a great job of reprising, updating, and injecting with humor the full range of Star Trek tropes, ranging from immersion in 20th (now 21st) human cultures to undercover missions on enemy worlds.
  • 1.8 also delivers on another Star Trek staple, giving major characters their own episodes.  We saw this with Bortus in 1.3, and with the doctor and her boys in 1.8, as well as Isaac (LaMarr had the limelight in 1.7).  We also get a good post-civilization reduced to barbarity in 1.8, an always-necessary warning about our own world.
  • But 1.9 was the most important of the foursome I saw last night.  The revelation that Kelly slept with Darulio because she was under the influence of his pheromones is a game-changer for The Orville, because it tells Ed (who was also under that influence in this episode) that Kelly's dalliance with Darulio was beyond her control.  Since I think Ed and Kelly are a great couple, I was glad to see that.  It was also good to see poor trodden-upon Yaphit finally get some with the doctor, for the same pheromonic reasons.
The Orville is firing its quantum drive on all cylinders, and I'll be back with a review for every part of the journey.

See also The Orville 1.1-1.5: Star Trek's Back ... The Orville 1.10: Bring in the Clowns


1st starship to Alpha Centauri ... had only enough fuel to get there

Monday, November 13, 2017

Outlander 3.9: The Seas

Ok, the ship at the end of Outlander 3.8 was not pirate but Portuguese, but we still got a good sea yarn this past Sunday in episode 3.9.

Claire and Jamie continue to explore - mostly enjoyably - the labyrinths of reestablishing a relationship after so many difficult years apart, and I thought that was handled very well, striking a right balance between getting to know each other again, but still very much loving each other.  And Claire's desperately missing her/their daughter was something that needed to be shown, and will no doubt play a major role in some future episodes (note again that I haven't read the novels).

I also liked Yi Tein Cho saving the day on the ship, though I'm not quite clear how he did it.  But he makes a great new enigmatic character,  just what Jamie needed to meet in the big city of Edinburgh, and now we the audience are getting to see at sea.  He's his own man, with an agenda all his own, and that makes him more like a character from the Seven Samurai than Hop Sing from Bonanza, even though Yi and Hop are both Chinese.

But the most appealing part of this episode was the promise of things to come, with some swashbuckling in the Caribbean, heralded by the new opening credits with lots of shots from the islands.  After two years of damp and chilly Scotland, I'm all for the blue skies and white sands of those adventurous islands.

See also Outlander Season 3 Debut: A Tale of Two Times and Places ...Outlander 3.2: Whole Lot of Loving, But ... Outlander 3.3: Free and Sad ... Outlander 3.4: Love Me Tender and Dylan ... Outlander 3.5: The 1960s and the Past ... Outlander 3.6: Reunion ... Outlander 3.7: The Other Wife ... Outlander 3.8: Pirates!

And see also Outlander 2.1: Split Hour ... Outlander 2.2: The King and the Forest ... Outlander 2.3: Mother and Dr. Dog ... Outlander 2.5: The Unappreciated Paradox ... Outlander 2.6: The Duel and the Offspring ...Outlander 2.7: Further into the Future ... Outlander 2.8: The Conversation ... Outlander 2.9: Flashbacks of the Future ... Outlander 2.10: One True Prediction and Counting ... Outlander 2.11: London Not Falling ... Outlander 2.12: Stubborn Fate and Scotland On and Off Screen ... Outlander Season 2 Finale: Decades

And see also Outlander 1.1-3: The Hope of Time Travel ... Outlander 1.6:  Outstanding ... Outlander 1.7: Tender Intertemporal Polygamy ...Outlander 1.8: The Other Side ... Outlander 1.9: Spanking Good ... Outlander 1.10: A Glimmer of Paradox ... Outlander 1.11: Vaccination and Time Travel ... Outlander 1.12: Black Jack's Progeny ...Outlander 1.13: Mother's Day ... Outlander 1.14: All That Jazz ... Outlander Season 1 Finale: Let's Change History

 

It all started in the hot summer of 1960, when Marilyn Monroe walked off the set of The Misfits and began to hear a haunting song in her head, "Goodbye Norma Jean" ...

The Orville 1.1-5: Star Trek's Back!

I'd planned on catching up on all the episodes of The Orville thus far before writing a review, but episode 1.5 was so good - and a time travel story to boot, my favorite kind of science fiction - that I couldn't wait any longer.  So here's this, and then I'll post another review when I'm caught up, and then I'll review every episode that comes after.

First, let me thank my colleague at Fordham University, Lance Strate, who recommended The Orville to me just last week.  He has a pretty good track record, his best recommendation so far being the reboot of Battlestar Galactica, which was much better than the original and superb.

I'm tempted to say The Orville is to Star Trek: The Original Series as Battlestar Galactica 2004 was to Battlestar Galactica 1978, but that wouldn't be quite right, because: (1) The original Star Trek was one of the best series ever on television, and the first BSG was, if not one of the worst, certainly nothing special, and (2) Battlestar Galactica 2004 was so dark as to be apocalyptic whereas The Orville is laugh-out-loud funny.

That's not surprising, since Seth MacFarlane not only stars in this latter day Star Trek as Captain Ed Mercer but is the creator of the series.  And the jokes are not only funny and continuous, with words like "dick" tossed around in just about every episode, but they don't interfere in the slightest with the outstanding science fiction in every episode, which was the strong suit of the original Star Trek.

In fact, I'd say The Orville is more like Star Trek the original series, truer to its pace and elan and sense of wonder, than any Star Trek since, with the exception of Star Trek: The Next Generation, which was in some ways better and some ways worse (and, come to think of it, The Orville is in some ways more reminiscent of the best parts of TNG and its interspecies-diverse crew than it is of TOS).  But everything else that's come since, whether on TV or in the movies, is just not as good, whatever their redeeming qualities.  (Ok, I only saw the first episode of Discovery, because I'm too cheap to pay for yet another streaming service, but that first episode was at best only all right in comparison to the first episode of The Orville.)

I won't summarize that for you - if you haven't seen it, do - but each of the five episodes I've seen so far packs a different kind of punch.  To return to episode 5, it's not quite as good as "City on the Edge of Forever" from TOS or "Yesterday's Enterprise" from TNG -- which are about the two best hours of time travel ever on television -- but it's pretty close, has respect for all the paradoxes of time travel, and like almost all fine time travel, even a thread I don't quite get.  When Kelly confronts Ed about telling the time traveler about Kelly and Ed's marital problems (they got divorced, because Ed found Kelly in bed with an alien who came in blue),  Ed says of course the time traveler knew, she came from the future, and Kelly says no, our problem took place in the past, and Ed admits he told the traveler.  But ... wait a minute, maybe that was a joke!

Kelly, by the way, is played by Adrianne Palicki of Friday Night Lights, and I'm always happy to see a star from that great series on TV again, just as I am about anyone from The Wire.  The crew, by the way, consists of five humans (Ed and Kelly, a woman doctor, and two guys on the bridge or whatever that is), a younger officer who looks like a Bajoran (well played by Halston Sage), a Lt.  Commander of some sort who looks like a Klingon (and lays an egg - not a bad joke, as Ed quips, but offspring), and some kind of highly intelligent android who sounds like Data but looks like the Tinman digital edition and maybe a little C3PO.  There's also an intelligent kind of slime with Norm MacDonald's voice, but I'm not sure if he's part of the crew.  These homages to Star Trek are of course deliberate and delightful, as is the music and the overall feel of the series.

Star Trek's back!

See also: The Orville 1.6-9: Masterful ... The Orville 1.10: Bring in the Clowns


1st starship to Alpha Centauri ... had only enough fuel to get there

Sunday, November 12, 2017

The Walking Dead 8.4: The King's Not Smiling

Not just the most powerful episode of The Walking Dead this season, but tonight's 8.4 is one of the best in the overall series so far.

First, it was a King Ezekiel episode, which was long overdue and a sight for sore eyes.  But this episode was just tragically perfect in all kinds of ways.

The King has been saying "And yet I smile" for a while now.  It was a constant reminder that, in a narrative such as The Walking Dead, there would come a day when he'd say that no more (all right, I won't write any more in King-speak).

We saw why that would happen at the end of last week's episode, when the King's force is ambushed.  That was shocking.  But the way it played out tonight was exquisite.

Ezekiel keeps denying as he's a king, to himself and even more eloquently and agonizingly to Jerry (who was just fabulous in his ferocious loyalty tonight).  Jerry's response, "Dude, I have to" call you my King said it all, and surpasses even Ezekiel's later, poignant protestation that he's not a king, he's just "a man".  The only way to survive a zombie apocalypse is to have at least the bare bones of order.

And speaking of the zombies, they had one of their best nights tonight, too, literally rising from the dead, all around Ezekiel, as he climbs up and out of the dead who sought a few minutes earlier with their last breaths to protect him from the lethal ambush.  This is the first time we've seen so many dead get up and go staggering, right in front of our eyes.

Carol had her best night in a while, too, saving Ezekiel and Jerry at a crucial time, after she disposes of most of Negan's people aka Negans.  But ...

Well, I haven't read the comics, but you didn't need that to know that Shiva would both come on and save Ezekiel and company at a crucial time, and die in the process.  I don't quite get why she couldn't pull free and get away, but the narrative arc called her to die in that sacrifice.

This episode makes clear why The Walking Dead is the most watched drama series on any channel or streaming service.  It's a show for the ages.

See also:  The Walking Dead 7.1 ... The Walking Dead 7.7: Negan and the Kids

And see also: The Walking Dead 6.1: The Walking Herd ...  The Walking Dead Season 6 Finale: Who Was It?

And see also: The Walking Dead 5.1: The Redemption of Carole ... The Walking Dead 5.3: Meets Alfred Hitchcock and The Twilight Zone ... The Walking Dead 5.4: Hospital of Horror ... The Walking Dead 5.5: Anatomy of a Shattered Dream ... The Walking Dead 5.6-7: Slow ... The Walking Dead 5.8: Killing the Non-Killer ... The Walking Dead 5.9: Another Death in the Family ... The Walking Dead 5.11: The Smiling Stranger ... The Walking Dead 5.12: The Other Shoe ... The Walking Dead 5.13: The Horse and the Party ... The Walking Dead 5.15: The Bad Guy ... The Walking Dead Season 5 Finale: Morgan and Optimism

And see also The Walking Dead 4.1: The New Plague ... The Walking Dead 4.2: The Baby and the Flu ... The Walking Dead 4.3: Death in Every Corner ...The Walking Dead 4.4: Hershel, Carl, and Maggie ... The Walking Dead 4.6: The Good Governor ... The Walking Dead 4.7: The Governor's Other Foot ... The Walking Dead 4.8: Vintage Fall Finale ... The Walking Dead 4.9: A Nightmare on Walking Dead Street ... The Walking Dead 4:14: Too Far ... The Walking Dead Season 4 Finale: From the Gunfire into the Frying Pan





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